Publication

How we developed an emergency psychiatry training course for new residents using principles of high-fidelity simulation

A publication piece evaluating the effectiveness of a training course in emergency psychiatry

Thomson, A. B., Cross, S., Key, S., Jaye, P., & Iversen, A. C. (2013)

Highlights

  • New psychiatry residents are poorly prepared for the challenges of out-of-hours working. They must rapidly develop a new repertoire of clinical skills and acclimatize to a new workplace culture
  • We have addressed this challenge by developing an immersive high-fidelity simulation training course
  • Human patient simulation training has the potential to improve clinical care for patients by allowing residents to acquire common skills before encountering patients and by allowing practice of critical situations which are rarely encountered

 

Abstract

Background

New psychiatry residents must rapidly acquire new clinical skills and learn to work effectively with new colleagues. In medical and surgical specialties, high-fidelity simulation with structured debriefing is widely used, but so far this has not been applied to psychiatry.

Method

New psychiatry residents must rapidly acquire new clinical skills and learn to work effectively with new colleagues. In medical and surgical specialties, high-fidelity simulation with structured debriefing is widely used, but so far this has not been applied to psychiatry.

Results

Evaluation of a pilot group found that the course was well received and improved participants’ workplace confidence.

Conclusion

Human patient simulation training has the potential to improve clinical care for patients by allowing residents to acquire common skills before encountering patients and by allowing practice of critical situations which are rarely encountered. We have successfully translated the training method to psychiatry in a novel course which combines human patient simulation with both manikins and actors. This method is popular among residents and educators, and we now plan expand the program with appropriate evaluation of whether the benefits justify the resources required.

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